Digital Collections

  • The Agnes Chamberlin collection consists of original paintings of Canadian flora and mushrooms by Agnes Chamberlin (1833–1913), dating from the period 1863 to the 1900s. In addition to the original paintings, the Chamberlin digital collection also includes early editions of Canadian Wild Flowers and two editions of Studies of Plant Life. Most of these original paintings have not previously been reproduced.

  • This collection features approximately 4,500 full page plates and other significant illustrations of human anatomy selected from the Jason A. Hannah and Academy of Medicine collections in the history of medicine at the Fisher Library. Each illustration has been fully indexed using medical subject headings, and the plates can also be searched or browsed by artist, engraver, lithographer and printer.

  • Drawing on materials, including photographs, original field notes, maps and published reports, from the J.B. Tyrrell, James Tyrrell and related collections, this site documents two exploratory surveys of the Barren Lands region west of Hudson Bay, in northern Manitoba and Saskatchewan and the area now known as Nunavut.

  • A collection of Canadian pamphlets that includes items printed in Canada, by Canadian authors, or about Canadian subjects, mainly of a non-literary nature.

  • The initial phase of a larger project to digitize Canadian periodicals, this site will present the first 20 years of the most significant Canadian trade journal documenting the history of the printing and publishing industry.

  • The Fisher Library is privileged to be the custodian of the single most important archive of Wolfe manuscript records in the world. This collection is of exceptional cultural and historical importance for all Canadians.

  • Collection of 190 pieces of vellum in Greek and Latin illustrating the history and development of handwriting from the 4th century until the end of the Middle Ages. Items 1-21 (which are Coptic in origin) illustrate the development of uncial writing from the beginning up to its decline in Egypt in the 9th century. A detailed finding aid is available in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

  • Ten percent of our 800 bound manuscript volumes have been digitized, representing a range of disciplines including history, theology, literature, philosophy, science, and medicine and in languages as diverse as Arabic, English, French, Ge'ez, German, Hebrew, Latin, and Persian.

  • This online site documents the initial period of the discovery and development of insulin by presenting over 7,000 page images reproducing original documents, from ranging from laboratory notebooks and charts, to scrapbooks and printed ephemera.

  • The Fisher Library is the third largest repository for the artistic works of Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677) after Windsor Castle and the National Gallery Collection of Prints and Drawings in the artist's native Prague, the Czech Republic.